REPUBLICA: TEMPLE OF COLOR AND SOUND



PRESS

MoMa PRESS:RECONSTRUCTIONS:ARCHITECTURE & BLACKNESS

PIN- UP:IDEAS CITY NEW ORLEANS: A STATE OF EXUBERANT HYBRIDITY

SUGARCANE MAGAZINE: KRISTINA KAY ROBINSON:SPIRITUALLY UNCENSORED:

NEW ORLEANS ART INSIDER:THE RENT IS TOO DAMN HIGH


Republica: Temple of Color and Sound is a multi-modal conceptual framework reimagining the past, present and future of the Gulf Coast region of North America. Inspired by early revolts in the Louisiana Colony such as the 1729 Natchez/Bambara revolt, the 1795 plot at Pointe Coupee and the 1811 German Coast Uprising, the largest slave revolt in United States History.  Republica: Temple of Color and Sound reimagines the 1811 revolt as a successful uprising of Black||Indigenous peoples resulting in a free territory held into perpetuity.

A vehicle of the theory’s itinerant philosophy, Temple of Color and Sound is a mobile gathering, learning, ritual and performance space dedicated to the memory and principles embodied by the 1811 rebellion. The temple’s proprietor, Maryam de Capita is channeled for public and private gatheringsby Kristina Kay Robinson.

Republica: Temple of Color and Sound engages literature, cinema, sound, visual and performance-art to refuse the inevitability of the present moment dominated by the extraction of natural resources and white supremacy by presenting a critical fabulation of what the past could have been and what the future has the potential to become.

Republica: Temple of Color and Sound has been presented in exhibition at “Welcome to the Afrofuture” during Miami Art Week, New Museum’s residency program, Ideas City and the New Orleans African American Museum.


Republica : Temple of Color and Sound.” The Rent is Too Damn High. New Orleans, LA. 2018.

The blue tent used in this iteration of the temple was constructed as a place to contemplate the presence of and necessity for unhoused people’s sacred spaces and a place of protection and renewal for those who have experienced violence or abuse.



Welcome to the AfroFuture: Ground Zero. New Orleans African American Museum. 2019.